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Miriam's Story: When i was nine years old i moved from Costa Rica to the United States, I loved to read in Costa Rica, but I never got to go to the library, my grandma sent me all my books,when I moved here I was exited becauese the library was five minutes away from my house. A couple of days after we moved, my mother took my brothers, and me to get a library card. We walked into the library and got library cards. the first book iI took out was a Nancy Drew 'Super Mystery' I will never forget my first day at the library, it has and is still helping me get my school work done.

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Joey's Story: The Carnegie Library in Oakland is the perfect place to get away. As a founder of 2 startup companies, I owe a lot of my successes to the Carnegie Library for giving me a place to bring my laptop and get an enormous amount of work done while looking for an office for my new company. The atmosphere, high cielings which promote creative thinking, friendly and knowledgeable staff, vast amount of resources, convenient parking, I can go on and on.

Now that I have an office and am up and running, I encourage my partners and employees to bring their laptops to the library whenever they want a change of pace and some peace of mind.

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Genevieve's Story: The Carnegie Library that I walked to weekly seventy years ago was in North Bessemer, Penn Hills ( then Penn Twp). It was located near the Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Round House . The top two public accessible floors contained the library, and the ground floor was given over to the railroad personnel who had sleeping and bathing accommodations for their overnight round trip.

The librarian's name was Mr. Warren McKissick, a splendid person who knew how I waited for the arrival of St. Nicholas magazine. I read all of the Bobbsey Twins books, some of the boys serials, and all of the classic childhood staples such as Black Beauty. I remember reading Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm and telling my mother, " I wish my name was Rebecca". The North Bessemer Carnegie Library is responsible for my becoming a Life Long Reader .

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Dorit's Story: I am an aspiring writer recently relocated from a kibbutz in Israel. I needed a library like an oasis in a desert. Back home, I did not have access to such an amazing selection of children's and adults section. I come here every day to sit, write and listen to my thoughts. At story hour- my son and I dngle in each other's arms, waitig for the next enchanting tale. although I have missed out on oceans of literary cultures, I am glad that I chosen such a helpful, up-to-date place to grow and be enriched by daily as I weed through the words of a book that I hope to one day publish. It is a place of many beginnings.

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Dave's Story: My first library card was my magic key to the Children's Department of the Carnegie Public Library in Charleston, Illinois. Our family had recently moved to this small downstate town, and as an elementary student with few friends, I quickly came to regard the library as a welcome refuge. I could walk there all by myself, any day after school, and wander through their collection. I read all their science fiction, and a complete shelf of biographies, including one of Andrew Carnegie, whom I came to regard as the builder of my favorite place in the world.

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Imagine my delight when thirty years passed and brought me to a job in Pittsburgh, two blocks from the Authentic and Original, Free to the People, Carnegie Main Library in Oakland. I still have the same thrill, three or four times a week, to walk to my favorite place in the world.

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Tierney's Story Growing up, my family never put much emphasis on reading. I sort of felt like Matilda, minus the magic and abuse. When I was old enough to cross the street by myself, I walked the three or four blocks to the library, and when my mom went looking for me, I made her get me a card.

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John's Story: My first library card was a long time ago, about 40yrs. I remember it was a hard plastic that had my number punched into it with an imprinting machine. It was before computers were standard and they still put date stamps on cards and placed them in little pockets on the back inside cover of the book. When you checked out they put your card on a machine and similar to an old credit card stamp and this was placed in the envelope along with the date stamp. There were no excuses for forgetting the date a book was due to be returned on. I really don't even remember how old I was except that I knew I had to be able to sign my name. This was in Chalmette, Lousiana, just east of New Orleans. Our "little" library was considered to be big and modern in comparison to most other communities, but it really wasn't that large. It was located just down the street from the high school and the elementary school. You had to look up books in the card catalog, now pretty much a thing of the past. I remember a few years after I started going to the library they updated the non fiction isles with motorized shelving, where several rows would move next to each other and another section would open up to view the books. This made it really difficult for several people to peruse the aisles at the same time. But the library was a focal point of our community, where we could have meetings, meet friends and since we didn't have computers in every home, where true research was taught. Libraries have always been a part of my life and it all started with one little card.

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Mona's Story: I don't have a story about my first library card, but it is about my first adult library card. You may remember that if you were under a certain age your library card was pink and the adult's cards were yellow. Every third weekend or so my Mother would take me and my older sister to the main library on the North Side in Allegheny Commons. When you walked in and passed the lobby you either went to the left towards the adult's section or to the right towards the children's section. Well, since my sister was three years older there came that moment that she got her "adult" library card and began to go the left with my Mother. After three long years of waiting with great excitement, I traded my pink card for the yellow and my Mother, sister and I all when to the left. Of course I had to get an adult book to go with the adult library card. Well, it was actually a young adult book, The Outsiders, by SE Hinton.

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Michelle's Story: I will always remember my first library card. I received it on a grade school field trip to the Penn Hills Library; it was peach colored with my named typed on it and a plastic, dark green strip imprinted with the expiration date. The idea that with the card I was able to borrow books and was going to be responsible for them was awesome, even better that I did not have to save my allowance to do so and the selection was endless.

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Shimira's Story: When I was in the second grade we moved to Homewood, and lived on Hamilton Avenue. Within the first month my mom took me to library to transfer my card and show me the way to library. Since we lived on Hamilton it was a few short blocks.

So when my friend came over, I want to show off my independence and we roller skated to the library. On the way home with books in hand and on skates, a girl jumped out the bushes and beat me up. When I got on the school bus on Monday, I was horified.

Recently, I found myself taking my preschool class to the Homewood library on the same route; I thought about that experience as the students chattered about our destination. I still love my library and that experience helped shape me.

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Amy's Story: I remember going to the Squirrel Hill library with my mom one hot summer day. It must have been 25 or more years ago. I was so excited to be able to check out my 'own' books. I remember checking out 'Snip, Snap, and Snur' I felt so grown up! (especially when I had to sign my name) I still visit the squirell Hill Library on an almost weekly basis and am looking forward to share the experience with my little girl when she gets a little older.

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Katherine's Story: When I was about 10 years old I discovered The Bookmobile! That was one of the best days of my life. My parents took me to the bookmobile and got my first library card for me. That card was my prized possession. There were very few weeks that didn't include a trip to exchange read books for new adventures. Many years later I made sure my sons got their cards and we visited the bookmobile together and then I was lucky enough to do the same with my granddaughters. Sadly - the bookmobile no longer visits our little town. Now we make Saturday trips to local libraries - the girls treasure their cards as much as I do.

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Carolyn's Story: My mother took me to get my library card at Grinnell Library in Wappingers Falls, NY about 45 years ago. The building had a turret, latticed windows, and a maze of stacks. No doubt we got out all kinds of books over the years, but the one I remember best was about a nurse who took care of a lot of people who got food poisoning because they ate bad eclairs. I have never eaten an eclair since.

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Betty's Story: my first was at the Mellon bank office bldg. when I returned home from Keywest Florda I had a card, but this was the 1st Pittsburgh library card I have ever had. I never used the library before I came home from Key West that I know of. I had used the colleges, and other types of equipment to do my poetry development, to get it for use and possibly publication, but I have only yet continued to progress its in length as a continous book "the emasculated woman", so know with the carnegie for 2-3 years since the rehibilitation of the downtown office changing from mellon bank bldg to wood street to the now smithfield business office library, with the shift i figured to stay at the main library there were more opportunity and appliances here to progress my future in, and i have immensely enjoyed all.

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Dianne's Story: I was about 7 or 8 years old when I got my first library card. It would have been in 1958 or 1959. My father took my sister and I to the East Liberty Branch, I enoyed getting books to read!! Now that I'm older I use my card to work on the computers and take out DVDs. I use the Downtown branch and the branch in Dormont where I live. I find my card most useful!!

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John's Story: I passed the ICDL Full Certification computer license in June 2007, studying for five months at different branches, adding to my prior qualifications.

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Sandy's Story: In 1986 I was a high school junior and my Dad decided that it was time for me to get a part-time job. I was not looking forward to working at the local grocery store and the thought of slinging slurpees at a convenience store was not very appealing.

I had heard about a library page opening at the Carnegie and applied. About three months went by before I had heard anything from the Carnegie. I was trying to hold off applying to other jobs. It was hard. My Dad got an interview for me, without my permission, at a local grocery store and told me that I was a shoe-in. I went to the interview and told the manager that I did not like to handle money and I did not like pushy customers. I was not called for that job but I finally got an interview at the library.

I was excited because I just knew that I had the job. The interview went well and I was hired on August 26, 1986. I started work a couple of days later and would meet the man who would become my husband.

Working at the Carnegie also inspired my career choice. I am a school librarian. If I had not been employed at the library, I might still be working a a grocery store.

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Marianne's Story: My family likes to visit Carnegie Libarary, the main branch in Oakland, every Saturday morning. My husband and I take turns finding books for the kids or ourselves, while our daughters, ages one and four, enjoy the many activities in the children's section of the library. When our family visits from out of town, we like to show off "our" library to them! Often, we'll see other families we know from our girls school or our own work. We all like the welcoming atmosphere at the library, especially the tolerance for children's noise. We also like that we can stop by the cafe at the library if we need a little snack, it makes it easier to keep the library a normal part of our week.

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Jelena's Story: The Music Department in the Carnegie Library saved my music. When we came to USA I did not bring along my music scores. Playing piano again in a new country was not the highest priority. After a decision to stay I realized I wanted to play piano again. Finding music scores I used to play to as a child brought tears of joy and excitement beyond any expectation. The library has the largest collection of music of all that I have ever seen. It brought me back to music, it brought me back the greatest joy.

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