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What's New in Business: April 2000
Particularly recommended by the business librarians are:

BF637.C4 J64 1998
WHO MOVED MY CHEESE? AN A-MAZING WAY TO DEAL WITH CHANGE IN YOUR WORK AND IN YOUR LIFE by Spencer Johnson, M.D.

It is the tenth best selling book of any kind at Amazon.com. It has been number one on the Wall Street Journal's list of best-selling business books for months. It is alternately hailed and reviled by readers and reviewers. Some argue that it is a classic, others that it has the depth and lasting qualities of a puddle on a hot summer day. It has the catchiest title to hit the bestseller list in years. The subtitle of the book is a pun on the "plot:" four characters confront a basic change in their lives and each has their own way of dealing with it. The story is simplistic and may alienate some readers who insist that only a complex treatment of a subject is worthy of their time and attention; but this may be missing the point. Who moved my Cheese? is not an in-depth analysis of the psychological effects of change. Nor is it a treatise on the concrete steps people and organizations may take to effect change in a positive manner. Rather it is a parable in the classic sense of that word -- a complex topic is reduced to its essentials and placed before us in the form of a simplified and instructive tale. The book is designed to be a quick-read and the message is one that will resonate strongly with any reader who has felt the twinges of fear in relation to change. Some reviewers argue the book could be reduced to a paragraph or two in length for its lack of content and complexity. Perhaps this is so, one could go even further and reduce it to President Roosevelt's one sentence, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself." However, the story works as a story and Who moved my cheese? might be of comfort to those who are feeling angry, frustrated, afraid and/or alone in attempting to cope with change. By presenting this parable in such a simple and easily graspable format, Dr. Spencer Johnson (Co-author of the One- Minute Manager) brings a sense of universality and belonging to the reader that has the potential to be quite liberating. (JF)

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HD 8039. I52 U65 1999x
STEEL: THE DIARY OF A FURNACE WORKER

(The Original 1922 Edition by Charles Rumford Walker, edited by Kenneth K. Kobus, was written by a young graduate of Yale University who "embarked on an idealistic project to explore an almost equal interest in the process of steelmaking, the administration of business, and the problem of industrial relations." Walker wanted the experience of being an outsider starting at the bottom of the steel industry, and in 1919, after his discharge from the Army, he came to Bouton Mill in Bouton, Pennsylvania to do just that. Bouton Mill was actually the Jones & Laughlin Steel Company in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. The identity of the mill and the town was disguised because Walker wanted to protect his sources in management who afforded him the opportunity to be an 'undercover' worker in the open hearth and blast furnace department at the mill.

The work was hot, dangerous, and strenuous. A 12-hour shift was the norm, as were 6-day work weeks. Twice a month, each man endured the "long turn," which was 24 hours of continuous work in order to make the transition from day shift to night shift. Immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe made up the majority of the work force and the men are referred to, and refer to one another, as "hunkies" and "wops." Walker details many of his duties in his part of the steel-making process, where teamwork and cooperation were critical and language and cultural barriers had to be overcome out of necessity. He acquired grudging respect for the technique of the shovel, the pick, and the wheelbarrow and learned how to pace himself in order to get through the grueling 24-hour shifts. He writes, "There is judgement and knack, and he is a fool who says that anyone can do the job."

Day shifts and night shifts alternated every few weeks, so the men were always tired. The long hours and constant fatigue eventually wore down all but the sturdiest workers. Although salaries were high, there was no time to enjoy life with one day off every two weeks. "Work all time, go home, sleep, no spend. To hell with the money! No can live," was a frequently expressed sentiment that made a deep impression on the author. Many single men worked and saved their money for ten or fifteen years so they could quit and return to the "old country" where they would marry, raise a family, and have some quality of life.

Although steel mills in England, France, Germany, and other European countries were successfully using the eight-hour shift system, the concept of converting from a two to a three-shift system appeared to be too radical for many plant managers in the U.S. at this time. Attempts were being made to unionize the steelworkers in the area, but the workers at J&L were reluctant to organize for change. The popular sentiment was that if you went against the status quo, you had no job. There were no leaders or organizers among the men at the local level; the unionization of the company would come later

STEEL:THE DIARY OF A FURNACE WORKER describes the intricate steps involved in the steel-making process as well as the complicated relationships between the immigrant workers and their supervisors. Many archival photographs of J&L's interior and the town of Aliquippa are included with the text. This rare and fascinating description of daily life within the mill provides readers with an understanding of the early days of the industry that defined the Western Pennsylvania area through most of the twentieth century. (NL)

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HG 179 .H345 1999
FOR RICHER, NOT POORER: THE MONEY BOOK FOR COUPLES by Ruth L. Hayden states that money is the primary source of conflict in a relationship. Faced with separation or divorce, couples who want their money life to work better must be willing to commit to change. They must stop blaming each other and realize they can't change the past. Each must accept 50% of the responsibility to stop blaming and start working together to create new ways to solve money problems. Many case studies are included, and accusations such as "You don't earn enough"! You waste money"! I'm the one who earns the money around here"! may be painfully familiar to many. Goals much be mutually agreed upon and clearly stated to make a new budgeting plan work. Money is to be divided into three categories - yours, mine, and ours - and compromises will have to be made. Specific ways to make budgeting choices that feel fair to both people are outlined. According to Ms. Hayden, the core of the money management program is the weekly money meeting, which gives the couple the opportunity to review money issues only without anger or blame. The meeting must have an agenda and should be held in a library, a restaurant, or other public place where couples can't get too loud or out of control. The four steps necessary to create new, successful behaviors with money are commitment, trust, respect, and compromise. It is difficult to change spending habits and understand why your partner might feel compelled to spend (or save) money in ways that are infuriating. But if your relationship is in danger because of arguments over money, this book could change your life. Following the steps that are outlined here "will forever improve your relationship as a couple by teaching you budgeting and money management techniques that will last a lifetime." (NL)

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FROM THE NEWSSTAND:An occasional feature highlighting interesting new business periodicals we think are especially engaging.

DOW THEORY FORECASTS, weekly, is a newsletter that studies the performance of the Dow Jones Industrial and Dow Jones Transportation Averages. It analyzes the potential next 12-18 month trend of the stock market and tells the reader whether the trend is bullish or bearish. This publication offers interesting features: a "Focus List" with top stock picks that may promise a one-to-three year gain, a market commentary with advice for cash and stock positions, a stock watch with recommended stocks and the major business and legal events that justify their inclusion in this portion, an analysis of general trends in the stock market, a featured report on a particular topic, e.g. midcap growth favorites, a "follow-up on monitored and recommended stocks"and an analysts' choice where details are provided for a particular stock that the Dow Theory Forecasts' staff finds particularly attractive. Periodically, special reports are released. Topics include the top electric utilities, a midyear and year-end outlook, stocks with dividend growth records, industry analyses, and a report on the best investments among DRIPS, Dividend Reinvestment Plans. [Available at the Periodicals Desk] (DK)

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Other titles of interest:

HC 102.5 .A2 F75 2000
HOW TO BE A BILLIONAIRE: PROVEN STRATEGIES FROM THE TITANS OF WEALTH by Martin S. Fridson

HD 38 .B248 1999
MOSES ON MANAGEMENT: 5O LEADERSHIP LESSONS FROM THE GREATEST MANAGER OF ALL TIME by David Baron

HD 57.7 .A848 1999
SHAKESPEARE IN CHARGE: THE BARD'S GUIDE TO LEADING AND SUCCEEDING ON THE BUSINESS STAGE by Norman Augustine and Kenneth Adelman

HD 255 .C86 1999
NOT ONE DOLLAR MORE!: HOW TO SAVE $3,000 TO $30,000 BUYING YOUR NEXT HOME by Joseph Eamon Cummings

HE 8700.79 .U6 S74 1999x
THE PBS COMPANION: A HISTORY OF PUBLIC TELEVISION by David Stewart

HG 179 .S2398 1999
THE SAVAGE TRUTH ON MONEY by Terry Savage

Contact the business librarians, who also answer questions about business, money, and work, at (412) 281-7141 or at www.carnegielibrary.org/locations/downtown/contact.cfm.

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