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What's New in Business: January 2000
Particularly recommended by the business librarians are:

HD9696.63.U62 C585 2000
THE NEW NEW THING: a SILICON VALLEY STORY, by Michael Lewis is the study of a complex, obsessive man who more than anyone else, "triggered the Internet boom." This fascinating analysis of Silicon Valley tracks the career of Netscape founder Jim Clark, a brilliant and tempestuous computer engineer who became the first man to create three separate billion-dollar companies. Following his bitter departure from the first of these, Silicon Graphics, Clark would go on to found Netscape. While Netscape gave the Internet the kick-start needed to make it the economic and cultural force it is today, Netscape also made Clark extremely rich, foreshadowing the near ubiquity of technology related wealth currently seen on Wall Street. What makes Clark so fascinating is his ability to predict, as well as influence, major shifts in technology, Wall Street and the way Americans would come to interact with computers.

Quickly it becomes apparent that while Clark enjoys his wealth, it is really his all-consuming ambition to successfully sniff out the "new new thing" as well as his disdain for the traditional world of finance that drives him. Throughout the book he takes great satisfaction making venture capitalists (whom he loathes) line up, hat in hand, almost as much as he does in challenging the Wall Street status quo. The real heroes of this story are computer geeks who start to realize the power they command in an economy where technology is becoming increasingly influential.

Equally fascinating is how quickly Clark loses interest in these billion dollar enterprises once they are off and running. Finding more satisfaction in creating the new, new thing rather than in overseeing its daily operation, Clark quickly lost interest in spending time nurturing Netscape (due in part to his correct assumption that Microsoft would take over the browser market) and set his sites on overhauling the American Healthcare industry. To accomplish this he created Healtheon, his third billion dollar company, whose successful IPO paved the way for today's market where countless technology companies create wealth without actually turning a profit.

Paralleling the rise of Healtheon is the ongoing story of Clark's other great passion - creating the world's first completely computerized sailboat. This element of the book is less enthralling than the business side of the story but it provides valuable insight into a man incapable of doing anything on a small scale. THE NEW NEW THING is as suspenseful as a spy novel and filled with the wit and insight that made Lewis' Liar's Poker, his book about Wall Street, a classic. (AM)

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HD 9940 .A2 A35 1999
THE END OF FASHION: THE MASS MARKETING OF THE CLOTHING BUSINESS by Teri Agins, a senior writer at The Wall Street Jounral, "tells the whole truth about this gigantic, flamboyant, and endlessly fascinating business." This book chronicles the massive changes in both fashion and merchandising during the past fifty years. Couture design, as conceived and executed by French designers for their handful of affluent clients, no longer dictates how women dress. The power now belongs to the consumers, who decide what they what to wear, where they buy it, and how much they are willing to pay for it. The driving force behind these changes can be attributed to factors such as the need for practical designs for working women, the trend toward "dressing down" in the office (Alcoa was the very first major corporation to sanction casual office attire in 1991), and the rise of stores such as Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, and Target that make it possible for women to have more options for dressing stylishly at sensible prices.

THE END OF FASHION provides fascinating glimpses of the careers of some of the major designers such as Ralph Lauren, who created idealized settings for his ads and was the first to introduce the concept of "lifestyle merchandising" in department stores. Tommy Hilfiger monitored Polo's every move; he was the first designer who dared to identify with the inner city street style that was "pure melting pot American." His hybrid mix of preppy and urban styles set a new standard for brand awareness, and soon Ralph Lauren was copying many of his copycat's fashion and marketing ideas. Perhaps the most interesting individual profiled is Georgio Armani, who has been one of the world's best-selling designers since the early 1980s. His biggest break came from the movie "American Gigolo", starring Richard Gere. He was the first designer to get his clothes on the backs of Hollywood actors, directors, and power brokers and is still the designer of choice on Oscar night. Donna Karan's rise from junior assistant to fashion diva is also detailed, along with the financial problems associated with her company's initial public offering and some of the missteps that her company is now trying to correct.

The author concluded her research in the spring of 1999, but the story of fashion continues to be told through Women's Wear Daily, the trade paper of the women's fashion industry received daily at The Library Center. Read about Tommy 's appearance with President Clinton, Donna's newest fragrance created in alliance with Estee Lauder,, the Georgio Armani retrospective exhibit to be mounted at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City next fall, a landmark in fashion and art museum history ... the beat goes on! (NL)

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HG 4527 .D767 1999
HOW TO INVEST $50 - $5000: THE SMALL INVESTOR'S STEP-BY-STEP DOLLAR-BY-DOLLAR PLAN FOR LOW-RISK, HIGH-VALUE INVESTING, 7th edition, is written by Nancy Dunnan, a financial analyst and author of numerous books on personal investing, including one of our all-time favorites, the annual Dun and Bradstreet Guide to $Your Investments$. More than two dozen investment choices are described in this book, arranged in sequence from what to do with your first $50 to strategies when you have $5000. With $50, a bank or credit union savings account can get you started on an investment plan. U.S. savings bonds provide another option at this level. With your first $500, you might consider opening a money market account at your bank, investing in a money market mutual fund, or buying a certificate of deposit. (CD). Joining an investment club is another idea, and many individuals have profited by investing a fixed sum through a club each month. With $1000 to invest, Ms. Dunnan strongly recommends investing in a tax-advantaged retirement plan (IRA or 401-k). Stock mutual funds and treasury notes are possibilities at the $2000 level.When you have $5000, the time has come to think about building a diversified stock portfolio. Ms. Dunnan's ABC's of stock selection are listed, along with five key standards to use when judging a stock. Guidelines for choosing a broker are given, and she has advice for going it alone using an online broker. This section also explains the workings of corporate bonds, municipal bonds, and zero coupon bonds, which are other possibilities at the $5000 level.

This book provides clear guidelines that can be easily understood by anyone interested in starting an investment program. Without ever talking down to the reader, Ms. Dunnan lays out the basic concepts of each type of investment, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. Sections such as "The Ten Dumbest Mistakes People Make About Money" (Mistake #1: Being ashamed to invest in small amounts) and "Nine Easy/Painless Ways to Save" (including "save your change at the end of each day") provide advice that new investors can put to good use immediately. Develop the habit of putting money aside for investing on a regular basis - you must pay yourself first. In order to become a good investor, you must set aside time to educate yourself. (you'll learn how to do that, too!) because, in the end, "no one cares as much about your money as you do. No one!" (NL)

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FROM THE NEWSSTAND: An occasional feature highlighting interesting new business periodicals we think are especially engaging.

RED HERRING, monthly, reports on how technology is changing the way we run our businesses, the trends in electronic commerce, and the emerging companies and industries with growth potential for investing or emulation. Unlike one of the original meanings of "red herring" which meant to divert or distract, this magazine promotes interest in what is in the real future for business and technology.

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Other titles of interest:

HB 95 .P42 1999
PATTERNS IN THE DARK: UNDERSTANDING RISK AND FINANCIAL CRISIS WITH COMPLEXITY THEORY, by Edgar E. Peters

HD 30.23 .W467 1999
MORAL IMAGINATION AND MANAGEMENT DECISION MAKING by Patricia H. Werhane

HD 30.28 .F639 1999
IMPLEMENTING YOUR STRATEGIC PLAN: HOW TO TURN "INTENT" INTO EFFECTIVE ACTION FOR SUSTAINABLE CHANGE by C. Davis Fogg

HD 30.3 .H3713 1999
POWERFUL CONVERSATIONS: HOW HIGH IMPACT LEADERS COMMUNICATE by Phil Harkins

HD 57.7 .C534 1999
RIGHT FROM THE START: TAKING CHARGE IN A NEW LEADERSHIP ROLE by Dan Ciampa and Michael Watkins

HD 58.8 .H34 1999
ADAPTIVE ENTERPRISE: CREATING AND LEADING SENSE-AND-RESPOND ORGANIZATIONS by Stephan H. Haeckel

HD 58.8 .S577 1999
SKYHOOKS FOR LEADERSHIP: A NEW FRAMEWORK THAT BRINGS TOGETHER FIVE DECADES OF THOUGHT: FROM MASLOW TO SENGE by John A. Shtogren.

HD 60 .S39 1999
WHEN GOOD COMPANIES DO BAD THINGS: RESPONSIBILITY AND RISK IN AN AGE OF GLOBALIZATION by Peter Schwartz and Blair Gibb

HD 62.5 .S687 1999
MONEY HUNT: 27 NEW RULES FOR CREATING AND GROWING A BREAKAWAY BUSINESS by Miles Spencer and Cliff Ennico

Contact the business librarians, who also answer questions about business, money, and work, at (412) 281-7141 or at www.carnegielibrary.org/locations/downtown/contact.cfm.

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