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What's New in Business: June 2000
Particularly recommended by the business librarians are:

HD 53 .L46 1999
WHEN SPARKS FLY: IGNITING CREATIVITY IN GROUPS by Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap defines creativity as a process of developing and expressing novel ideas that are likely to be useful. Leonard and Swap view creativity as a group process which can be encouraged, enhanced, and enabled by managers, making any group more creative in spite of individual abilities. The creative process consists of five steps: (1) preparation-- relevant knowledge and experience, (2) an opportunity for innovation, (3) generating options, (4) incubation--time out to think about the ideas that have been generated, and (5) convergence, or selecting options. The authors analyze these steps, including useful suggestions for managing them. Believing that creativity is stimulated by a diversity of perspectives, Leonard and Swap describe why and how such groups are designed. They also discuss how to encourage divergent thinking, how to choose the best options, and how to design a creative ecology--an atmosphere in which ideas flow and people want to be active and involved. (RS)

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HF 5548.32 .F56 2000x
ENTERPRISE E-COMMERCE: THE SOFTWARE COMPONENT BREAKTHROUGH FOR BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS COMMERCE by Peter Fingar, Harsha Kumar & Tarun Sharma provides an excellent template for businesses interested in engaging in e-commerce. Executives who sense the imperative to take their B2B enterprises to the web but who remain unsure about the business practices, models and technologies necessary to excel are sure to find this book an important guide. The goal of the authors is to provide a work that gives executives the "vocabulary, concepts and notions needed to formulate an [e-]business strategy," while giving technology officers both a broader understanding of the business issues involved and a clearer awareness of the technological needs of enterprise e-commerce. The authors suggest everyone read the first two introductory chapters and then pick and choose from the rest according to their specific needs. The chapters are well structured to make that possible. An extensive bibliography and other useful information sources are appended. (JF)

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HG 4910 .E285 2000
ORDINARY PEOPLE, EXTRAORDINARY WEALTH by Ric Edelman reveals "the eight secrets of how 5,000 ordinary Americans became successful investors - and how you can, too." The book focuses on the real-life practices and habits of many clients in Mr. Edelman's financial advisory firm and much of it is told in their own words. Many themes are repeated over and over - save regularly, pay yourself first, begin saving when you are young, invest for the long term, diversify your investments, and don't be too conservative. "The Biggest Mistake I Ever Made" has individuals confessing that they should have invested in stocks sooner, they should have had a financial advisor, shouldn't have invested in penny stocks or followed hot tips, and they shouldn't have accumulated so much credit card debt. On the positive side, "The Smartest Thing I Ever Did" included investing to the maximum in a 401K program, getting out of credit card debt, living below one's means, educating your children about saving and investing, and getting over the fear of risk. Although many people repeat the same sentiments, it is still helpful to learn about the experiences of others, both positive and negative. Perhaps some of their thoughts can help you change your financial life in a positive way, regardless of your stage of life. (NL)

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HM 1033 .G53 2000
THE TIPPING POINT. HOW LITTLE THINGS CAN MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE by Malcom Gladwell is a little book with a big idea. The author suggests that the principles that govern epidemics of social behavior, diseases and ideas can be used in tipping society over into accepting major trends. Gladwell postulates three rules for the tipping point: the Law of the Few, the Stickiness Factor and the Power of Context. All must be in play on the trajectory for successful change. The Law of the Few covers a group of people with special gifts: the 'connectors' whose interests and activities span many sectors of society, the "mavens" who have not only accumulated knowledge but have a strong calling to share this knowledge with others and the "salesmen" who have the skills to persuade us when we are unconvinced. Paul Revere succeeded in convincing the colonists there was pending danger while others with the same mission failed. Revere was a classic connector whose cache gave credence to his warnings. The Stickiness Factor suggests that it's not enough to reach as many people as possible with a message. The critical issue is that the message must be so memorable that it can spur someone to action. The Power of Context is based on the premise that tinkering with the smallest details of the immediate environment can cause or reverse an epidemic. Bell Telephone selected the number 7 for a phone number; it was long enough to allow for many different combinations but short enough to remember. The number 150 is an apparent optimum number of employees for a large enterprise to operate successfully at one location. A larger number results in a breakdown in communication and sluggish productivity. The massive crime wave that hit New York in the 1980's was significantly reduced not by exponentially increasing the police force, but by eliminating all traces of graffiti.

Gladwell delivers the message that major changes do not require major actions. We are all influenced by our surroundings, our immediate context and the personalities of those around us. For entrepreneurs who want to increase their customer base, this book offers a window into human behavior that can be translated into successful marketing and advertising. (DK)

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EAST EUROPEAN KOMPASS on DISC (EEKOD) is a new CD-ROM product that includes information on 289,415 companies from Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine, and Yugoslavia. With this exciting new addition to our CD-ROM LAN, researchers and entrepreneurs looking to expand their businesses abroad can pinpoint key areas of interest in this volatile but growing market. Record content features company name, address, telephone number, fax number, line of business, and contacts. Exporter/importer tags are also included for even greater detail. You will have the option to print your results or download them to a floppy disk in several different formats. Although this database is not as user-friendly as some of the other CD-ROMs on the Library Center's LAN, the depth of detail and quality of information contained in each record is unsurpassed. See one of the business reference librarians if you want to learn more about this great new product. (SP)

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Other titles of interest:

HD 69 .C6 B57 2000x
FLAWLESS CONSULTING: A GUIDE TO GETTING YOUR EXPERTISE USED by Peter Block

HD 4904.25 .S33 2000
COMING UP FOR AIR: HOW TO BUILD A BALANCED LIFE IN A WORKAHOLIC WORLD by Beth Sawi

HD 9696.63 .U64 O727 2000
THE ORACLE EDGE: HOW ORACLE CORPORATIONS' TAKE NO PRISONERS STRATEGY HAS CREATED AN $8 BILLION SOFTWARE POWERHOUSE by Stuart Read

HF 5386 .O69 2000
INNER EXCELLENCE AT WORK: THE PATH TO MEANING, SPIRIT, AND SUCCESS by Carol M. Orsborn

HF 5415.1265 .M63 2000
NOW OR NEVER: HOW COMPANIES MUST CHANGE TODAY TO WIN THE BATTLE FOR INTERNET CONSUMERS by Mary Modahl

HG 4515.95 .B47 2000
STRATEGIES FOR THE ELECTRONIC FUTURES TRADER by Jake Bernstein

Contact the business librarians, who also answer questions about business, money, and work, at (412) 281-7141 or at www.carnegielibrary.org/locations/downtown/contact.cfm.

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