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Addenda


Staff--Conditions of Employment.
Classification and Pay Plans.
Retirement Plans.
Health Insurance.
Credit Union.
Staff Association.
Presidents, Board of Trustees.
Directors, 1895-1969.
Circulation, 1896-1968.
Number of Volumes, 1896-1968
Appropriation, 1896-1968.

Staff--Conditions of Employment
Staff members of Carnegie Library are employees of the Library's Board of Trustees. They are not City employees. They are not subject to the City's Civil Service rules or residential requirements, nor are they eligible for City pensions. They are completely free from political pressures. A former Director ahs said that "during my 36 years in office, no Mayor or member of City Council has ever sought any favors for any member of the staff."

The Director is elected by the Board of Trustees. The Assistant Director is appointed by the Director, with the approval of the Board. Other staff members are appointed by the Director, or by a subordinate administrator acting for him.


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Classification and Pay Plans
For the first time in its history, the Library began in 1948 to operate under a classification of positions and a salary scale which were officially recognized by the City of Pittsburgh. There had been, of course, classification plans which were made by the Library itself; salary levels had depended upon what could be accomplished within the limits of the annual budgets.

The plans were initiated by City Council and were to include City employees only, but when the Library's needs were made plain Council agreed that it be included. The studies and the plans were made by the Pennsylvania Economy League. Every staff member made a job analysis of his position which was then approved by the immediate supervisor. The League made the classification plan based upon the requirements of education, training, skill, responsibility, and supervisory duties.

Salary scales were grouped around the $3,000-3,600 level which was adopted for the beginning professional staff.

There were only seventeen Library employees whose 1948 salaries equaled the minimum set by the new scale. The 1949 City appropriation included a $180 increase for each full-time employee, with an additional $70 for those who were below the scale. Thereafter Council quite regularly made provision for increments to bring staff members up to the maximum salary for the grade. The classification and salary plans are shown on page 13 of the Annual Report for 1948.

By 1954 it had become necessary to offer $3,600 to all beginning professionals, but there had not been sufficient funds to make comparable increases for experienced staff members. A new scale was therefore made which provided for regular annual increments of $600 up to the limit of the position; the limit was also raised in the higher categories. City Council decided that nothing could be done in 1955, but it authorized the Library to include the increments in the 1956 budget. For several years thereafter, City Council made budgetary allowances for these increments, even in those years in which there were no across-the-board increases for City employees.

Inflation had made the pay plan of 1948 as revised in 1954, unrealistic, and in 1962 the Pennsylvania Economy League submitted an up-dated one. It (1) defined and outlined typical duties, and stated the qualification requirements for each type of position; (2) grouped positions; (3) proposed new and more descriptive titles; (4) proposed a new salary scale with ranges from $5,402 to $9,730 for the professional staff, and $2,665 (messenger) to $8,650 (bindery foreman) for others.

The new plan was endorsed by the Board of Trustees and the members of City Council, but at budget time it was decided by Council that there could be no salary increases for 1963.

The budget for 1964 made provision for the increased salaries, and raised the beginning professional salary from the planned $5,402 to $5,843, a figure which was more competitive.

By the end of 1967, the plan's salary limits had been exceeded in all categories, with the amount actually paid to beginning professionals being $6,320. Salaries in excess of the plan had been made possible by a series of larger budgets.

Following studies made by the Personnel Office, the Board of Trustees approved a revised classification and Pay Plan, covering both professional and non-professional employees in order to keep the Library competitive in securing and retaining competent staff members. The revised plan, to be effective January 1, 1969, raised the beginning salary for professional librarians to $7,109, and clerical assistant I to $3,508. The top professional salary was pegged at $15,800.

Each annual report, beginning in 1945, includes a list of salary rates by category of position.


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Retirement Plans
The Library had no retirement and pension provision until February, 1938, when it became a contributing member of the retirement annuity plan devised by the A. L. A., with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company as insurer. The usual type of annuity policy, guaranteeing a specified monthly payment upon retirement at age 65, was issued by the Metropolitan Co. to members.

Staff members who had been in library service, here or elsewhere, for three or more years were eligible as voluntary members; five percent of their salary was deducted and paid to the Company.

At age 35 (later 30) membership became compulsory, and the Library began to add four percent to the staff members' five percent of the salary. (The one percent differential was due to a contract provision that in case of death before retirement, the member's contributions would be paid to her estate, while those of the Library would be retained by the Company.)

Without much persuasion, City Council agreed that the cost of the plan should be added to the Library's annual budget.

Provision was not so readily made for members' "back service," that is, the years during which the employee had served Carnegie before the plan became available in 1938. Metropolitan had found that it must have a lump sum payment of $150,000 if it were to include back service in its annuities. City Council refused to pay this amount. A study was then made by the Library Controller, using the actual date of retirement of each member. He agreed that a total of $150,000 was needed, but found that if the Library itself accumulated the fund, it would remain solvent by adding $7,500 annually for 20 years. City Council quickly agreed to this arrangement.

Staff members who had retired, or were about to do so, were still without an allowance. It was agreed in 1947 that the Contingent Fund should be used to give them small pensions--$50 per month at first, and rising gradually to $100 as fewer pensioners were left.

The original members of the A. L. A. / Metropolitan plan were guaranteed fairly generous annuities, but Metropolitan soon began to lower them for subsequent members.

The A. L. A. / Metropolitan plan remained in force until 1959, when it became possible for the Library to join the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association (T. I. A. A.). This association is normally available only to college, universities, and other educational institutions. Carnegie Institute was clearly eligible, and since the Institute and the Library operate under the same trustees and fiscal officers, T. I. A. A. decided that both institutions could be admitted. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh is the only public library on T. I. A. A. rolls.

Regular guaranteed annuities under T. I. A. A. were somewhat more generous than those of Metropolitan. More important, T. I. A. A. operates the College Retirement Equity Fund (C. R. E. F.) which is, in effect, a mutual investment fund. At least one-half of each member's contribution must be invested in a fixed T. I. A. A. annuity which provides a pre-determined number of dollars upon retirement. The member may elect to have up to one-half of his contribution go to C. R. E. F., which pays a variable annuity depending upon the dividends from securities which it holds. C. R. E. F. thus becomes a hedge against inflation.

The member and the Library each pay five percent of the salary, the total contribution being divided between T. I. A. A. and C. R. E. F. according to the member's election.

Beginning in September, 1959, all new full-time staff members were required to join T. I. A. A. / C. R. E. F. upon completing one year of service and attaining age 30, unless the appointment was definitely temporary.

Members of the A. L. A. / Metropolitan plan had the option of remaining in it or transferring. In general, those who were within a few years of retirement remained with Metropolitan; younger members made the change.


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Health Insurance
The Library became a member of Blue Cross and Blue Shield in February, 1938. At first, entrance was voluntary, and members paid assessments; now, the Library pays the full cost, and all full-time staff members are included.

A Major Medical Plan under T. I. A. A. was initiated in 1958, but it has been carried by Blue Cross since January 1, 1968. All full-time staff members are included after six months of service. The employee's cost is 25 cents per month for individual coverage, or $1.00 if qualified dependents are included. The Library pays the rest of the cost


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Credit Union
Organization of the Credit Union was completed June 16, 1936. It is open to full-time members of the staffs of both the Library and the Institute, upon payment of a 25 cent membership fee. In October, 1967, it had 314 members and assets of $155,000.


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Staff Association
The Carnegie Library Staff Association was formed October 24, 1943, with all staff members eligible for membership. The Association's announced purpose was "to provide social, economic and professional advantages for the general staff." There were 54 founding members. At the end of 1968 there were 345 members. The Association is affiliated with the Staff Organization's Round Table (S. O. R. T.) of the American Library Association. Laura Cathon was chairman of S. O. R. T. in 1951.

The Association has operated largely through its committees: Professional Advancement, Program, Progress, Survey and Membership. The Association is responsible for the Staff Library, and Bagpipe Notes.

Its program has included lectures and panel discussions on many aspects of librarianship, literature, and some of a more general nature.

Committees have been a direct aid in administration in many ways, such as devising forms for the merit ratings, surveying hours of library usage looking toward changes in hours of opening, making job descriptions of all positions.

The Association has been most helpful in spreading understanding of the reasons behind library policies throughout the staff.

It has been the staff spokesman who has requested improvements, including lighting and refurnishing the staff rooms.

Social affairs have been varied: a bowling league, trips to historical and scenic spots, theater parties, picnics and parties.

From its dues of 75 cents per year, the Association sends flowers in case of death and provides a gift for members who retire.


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Presidents of the Board of Trustees
William N. Frew               February 22, 1894 - May 28, 1914
Samuel Hardin Church          May 28, 1914 - October 11, 1943
William Frew                  October 26, 1943 - January 31, 1948
James M. Bovard               February 20, 1948 - December 31, 1967
James M. Walton               January 1, 1968 -


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Directors
Edwin H. Anderson          1895 - December 1, 1904
Mr. Anderson must have reported for duty early in 1895, because by May 1 he had assembled a small staff, and cataloguing of the initial book collection had begun.
Anderson H. Hopkins        January 1, 1905 - September 1, 1908
Harrison W. Craver         December 1, 1908 - March 31, 1917
John Hopkins Leete         April 1, 1917 - January 9, 1928
Ralph Munn                 June 7, 1928 - September 30, 1964
Keith Doms                 October 1, 1964 - August 30, 1969
Anthony A. Martin          September 1, 1969 - August 2, 1985
Elwood H. McClelland, Technology Librarian, was Acting Director during the "Fall of 1926."
C. Teft Hewitt, Head of the Order Department, was Acting Director, January - June 7, 1928.

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Circulation
Through 1913, the Library's statistical year began February 1, and ended January 31 of the following year. In 1914 the statistical year was changed to the calendar year. The report for 1914 covers eleven months only.

1896               115,394 (14 Months)
1897               119,962
1898               175,931 (Includes Lawrenceville)
1899               345,590 (Includes 5 branches)
1900               428,686
1901               488,126
1902               522,774
1903               607,442
1904               645,093
1905               661,891
1906               762,190
1907               884,760
1908               999,339
1909             1,162,309
1910             1,134,789
1911             1,232,646
1912             1,318,183
1913             1,417,089
1914             1,351,731 (11 Months)
1915             1,355,980
1916             1,176,193
1917             1,245,605
1918             1,115,533
1919             1,363,365
1920             1,418,430
1921             1,632,385
1922             1,654,074
1923             1,693,271
1924             1,807,377
1925             1,915,465
1926             2,036,289
1927             2,304,912
1928             2,550,586
1929             2,855,283
1930             3,326,019
1931             3,829,629
1932             4,270,052
1933             4,182,652
1934             4,034,776
1935             3,933,097
1936             3,662,121
1937             3,771,740
1938             4,114,994
1939             4,243,273
1940             4,081,187
1941             3,612,142
1942             3,166,567
1943             2,938,937
1944             2,930,785
1945             2,866,935
1946             2,955,008
1947             2,918,142
1948             2,889,261
1949             2,963,687
1950             2,879,001
1951             2,747,355
1952             2,719,336
1953             2,634,587
1954             2,716,316
1955             2,760,265
1956             2,967,100
1957             3,072,403
1958             3,395,516
1959             3,569,370
1960             3,757,094
1961             4,499,847
1962             4,683,711
1963             4,848,281
1964             4,784,954
1965             4,748,308
1966             4,587,451
1967             4,627,611
1968             4,381,625


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Volumes in Collection

1896                26,859
1897                30,726
1898                57,597
1899                96,172
1900               122,481
1901               140,507
1902               154,321
1903               173,006
1904               200,263
1905               222,452
1906               254,562
1907               280,088
1908               292,083
1909               333,304
1910               340,209
1911               364,624
1912               383,603
1913               405,394
1914               419,149
1915               422,201
1916               424,421
1917               434,469
1918               445,753
1919               464,313
1920               479,068
1921               492,828
1922               501,390
1923               519,351
1924               545,364
1925               570,334
1926               599,019
1927               629,044
1928               670,177
1929               724,112
1930               773,045
1931               823,500
1932               867,743
1933               900,849
1934               922,226
1935               941,016
1936               956,903
1937               986,093
1938             1,017,856
1939             1,041,658
1940             1,063,519
1941             1,078,495
1942             1,085,117
1943             1,145,908
1944             1,154,638
1945             1,114,814
1946             1,139,313
1947             1,163,468
1948             1,186,569
1949             1,193,902
1950             1,210,867
1951             1,219,963
1952             1,233,862
1953             1,249,001
1954             1,275,012
1955             1,285,510
1956             1,306,903
1957             1,344,501
1958             1,433,330
1959             1,408,908
1960             1,474,636
1961             1,522,807
1962             1,716,152
1963             1,765,818
1964             1,836,814
1965             1,900,672
1966             1,966,924
1967             2,048,208
1968             2,120,310


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Appropriation
City Only, through 1955

Year Beginning
1896 Feb. 1       $ 65,000
1897                65,000
1898                90,000
1899               104,000
1900               126,000
1901               131,000
1902               131,000
1903               131,000
1904               158,000
1905               158,000
1906               200,000
1907               200,000
1908               210,000
1909               235,000
1910               225,000
1911               250,000
1912               250,000
1913               260,000
1914 Jan. 1        250,710
1915               200,000
1916               230,000
1917               250,000
1918               262,500
1919               300,000
1920               357,697
1921               416,320
1922               416,320
1923               449,030
1924               459,047
1925               460,050
1926               477,000
1927               508,750
1928               541,100
1929               555,922
1930               594,619
1931               587,131
1932               540,357
1933               458,823
1934               460,614
1935               467,375
1936               479,375
1937               525,550
1938               549,084
1939               571,648
1940               562,095
1941               567,716
1942               569,679
1943               552,464
1944               576,606
1945               610,687
1946               653,823
1947               723,539
1948               815,228
1949               921,603
1950               956,313
1951             1,067,280  
1952             1,149,813
1953             1,250,940
1954             1,316,401
1955             1,335,401

City, County & State

           City         County         State         Total         
1956            $1,428,997   $125,000                     $1,553,997
1957             1,591,984    143,904                      1,735,888
1958             1,694,285    232,000                      1,926,285
1959             1,769,069    347,420                      2,116,489
1960             1,833,937    347,420                      2,181,357
1961             1,884,584    379,250                      2,263,834
1962             1,935,607    388,605       $ 19,792       2,344,004
1963             1,924,425    449,805        218,055       2,592,285
1964             1,854,511    749,805        313,892       2,918,208
1965             1,898,995    857,050        416,137       3,172,182
1966             1,906,690    995,000        478,986       3,380,676
1967             1,845,905  1,150,000        783,943       3,779,848
1968             2,009,424  1,193,768        863,791       4,066,983 

CLP History Table of Contents

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